This blog will keep you informed about the "outer space" series:

New book publication „Planetary Echoes - Exploring the Implications of Human Settlement in Outer Space


The succesful launch of SpaceX´s Falcon9 Heavy Rocket on 6 February - now heading to Mars - clearly demonstrates that we are entering a new space age - humanity is on the way to become a bi-planetary species in the next decades. The perfect moment for Michael Najjar and Lukas Feireiss to announce the publication of the new book "Planetary Echoes - Exploring the Implications of Human Settlement in Outer Space" which explores the idea of future human existence on other planets - and the companion theme of the colonisation of space - in art, literature and science. The collection of authors who have contributed an essay to this publication must surely be unrivalled anywhere in the world. In the synergy of their texts a breath-taking vision unfolds of our future life in space.

The editors wish to thank the following authors for their inspiring and visionary contributions:
Buzz Aldrin, Anousheh Ansari, Nelly Ben Hayoun, Thore Bjørnvig, Richard Branson, Clouds Architecture Office, Pierre Cox, Xavier De Kestelier, Norman Foster, Alexander C. T. Geppert, Ulrich Köhler, Michael López-Alegría, Greg Lynn, Fabian Reimann, Tim Smit, Christiane Stahl, Sethu Vijayakumar, Andy Weir, Frank White, Peter Weibel.


Published by Spector Books Leipzig
230 pages
89 black-white and colour illustrations
Leipzig, January, 2018
ISBN: 9783959051910
Size: 18 cm x 11 cm
Language: English

Michael Najjar, Lukas Feireiss

Book Design
Floyd E. Schulze, WTHM – Büro für Gestaltung

Available in selected bookstores and

Michael portrays the world´s biggest artificial sun


The world’s biggest artificial sun has been blazing at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Jülich since 2017. Development of new production processes for solar fuels is the focus of this globally unique Synlight facility for solar research. It consists of 149 powerful Xenon short-arc lamps which scientists can concentrate on a target surface of 20 x20 centimetres. If this surface is irradiated with beams of up to 350 kilowatts, a light intensity is produced equivalent to more than 10,000 times the solar radiation on the surface of the Earth. When the lamps are focussed they create temperatures of up to 3,000 degrees Celsius which researchers use to produce fuels such as hydrogen. Hydrogen is widely held to be the fuel of the future as it burns without giving off carbon dioxide. Production of hydrogen involves the splitting of the basic material, water, into its two components, hydrogen and oxygen.

Hydrogen is a crucial basic material for spaceflight, and is used as fuel by rockets, spaceships and satellites. As there’s an abundance of water in space - asteroids, for instance, harbour plentiful reserves - in future solar energy could be used to produce the fuel directly in space. Development of solar fuels is essential not just for spaceflight alone but also for our own lives on Earth because in tomorrow’s world renewable energies will form the backbone of the global energy supply.

Special thanks to:
German Aerospace Center (DLR)
Kai Wieghardt, Michel Winand

Michael participates in the exhibition “Rivoluzione Galileo. L’arte incontra la scienza”


Galileo Galilei (1564–1642) is one of the most famous and important scientists in history. Playing a key role in the 17th century scientific revolution, Galileo remains a towering figure in the transition from natural philosophy to modern science and the transformation of the scientific Renaissance into a scientific revolution. His worldwide fame rests on his radical new concept of the universe first set forth with the publication of his Sidereus nuncius (Starry Messenger, 1610). 

The aim of the exhibition “Rivoluzione Galileo. L’arte incontra la scienza” is to visualize his radical new thinking through images of the skies created before and after Galileo. By charting the change from the skies of the astrologers to the skies of astronomers, it shows how these radical new conceptions have evolved into different artistic notions over the past centuries. Next to Galileo’s legacy, the exhibition showcases the profound influence exercised by his discoveries and modern science on arts and culture since the early 1600s. In its unprecedented celebration of the life and work of Galileo in Padua (including his own splendid aquarelles and sketches), this landmark exhibition also presents a series of stunning masterpieces representing seven centuries of world art.

 Michael Najjar was invited to participate in this major historic exhibition with three key artworks from his “outer space“ series: “orbital ascent“ (2016), “gravitation entanglement” (2014) and his “spacewalk” video (2013).

Artists featured in the show include:
Galileo Galilei, Leonardo da Vinci, Jacopo Ligozzi, Adam Elsheimer, Peter Paul Rubens, Francesco Furini, Justus Sustermans, Jusepe de Ribera, Francesco Maria del Monte, Donato Creti, Étienne-Louis Boullée, William Blake, Gustave Doré, Emile Antoine Bayard, Alphonse de Neuville, Odilon Redon, Georges Méliès, Bruno Taut, Joan Miró, Max Ernst, Lucio Fontana, Thomas Ruff, Michael Najjar, Wolfgang Tillmans, Trevor Paglen, Anish Kapoor.

Curated by 
Giovanni Carlo Federico Villa and Stefan Weppelmann

Publication available

Palazzo del Monte de Pietà Padua, Piazza Duomo 14, Padua, Italy
Fondazione Cassa di Risparmio di Padova e Rovigo
Exibition dates: 18 November, 2017 – 18 March, 2018

Michael took pictures of the world´s largest telescope in China


China built this staggeringly large instrument called the “Five hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope” (FAST) in the remote and hardly accessible southern, mountainous region of the country. Inaugurated in 2016, the telescope was constructed in a natural sinkhole surrounded by the unique mountains of the Pingtang valley. The telescope has an incedible diameter of 500 m. The surface is made of 4450 triangular metal panels building the form of a geodesic dome. It can be tilted by a computer to change the focus on different areas in the Universe. Radio telescopes use a large, parabolic dish to collect radio waves from distant sources, such as pulsars, black holes and gravitational waves. However one of the main objectives of the instrument is detecting interstellar communication signals – finding signals from alien civilisations.

Michael was privileged to be given a unique opportunity to portrait this extraordinary astronomical instrument.

Michael´s work now on view at the 7th Moscow Biennale 2017


The 7th International Moscow Biennale 2017, curated by Yuko Hasegawa, has opened this week at the world famous State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow. The concept of the main exhibition Clouds⇄Forests focuses on a new ecosystem formed through the circulation of "Cloud Tribes" born in the cloud, and "Forest Tribes" born in an analogue world. Michael Najjar exhibits several large-scale pieces from his celebrated "outer space" series.


Participating artists:
Nadim Abbas, Adel Abidin, Nindityo Adipurnomo, Farah Atassi, Kanako Azuma, Matthew Barney, Natalia Bazowska, Bahar Behbahani, Björk, Hussein Chalayan, Revital Cohen & Tuur Van Balen, Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg, Rohini Devasher, Louise Drulhe, Olafur Eliasson, Justine Emard & Mirai Moriyama, Cécile B. Evans, Ilya Fedotov-Fedorov, Valia Fetisov, "Forensic Architecture", Theaster Gates, Gauri Gill, Marta Gornicka, Alina Gutkina, Joey Holder, Elliott Hundley, Pierre Huyghe, Ali Kazma, Nile Koetting, Siji Krishnan, Alexey Martins, Mathieu Merlet-Briand, Marie-Luce Nadal, Michael Najjar, Koji Nakazono, Dashi Namdakov, Uriel Orlow, Anastasia Potemkina, Laure Prouvost, Aurora Sander, Susan Schuppli, Sayaka Shimada, Wieki Somers, Yuken Teruya, Sissel Tolaas, Michael Tolmachev, Ryan Trecartin, Hanna Tuulikki, Alexander Vinogradov and Vladimir Dubossarsky, "Where Dogs Run", Robert Zhao Renhui, Marina Zurkow.  


Special thanks to 
Yuko Hasegawa and her team

And to Wemhöner Collection